Remember being a nervous parent? (or still are)

This daddy screech owl protected his owl nest while waiting for the eggs to pop open.

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And then, at least one, did! Quite a funny looking fellow, eh?

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I know this whole family is saying, “Thank you, David Stalker, for building this owl house for us, putting it in your backyard, and for taking our picture. Now, we are happy AND famous.”

When Mother Nature thumps you into awareness

Yesterday morning, when I woke up, I couldn’t talk. This morning, when I woke up, I still couldn’t talk. I mean, NOT AT ALL. Laryngitis is an interesting condition. Perhaps it is nature’s way of telling you to listen, to be still, to be contemplative.

I counted my blessings.

But damnit, I wanted to add to the lunch conversation! I had things to contribute, information to share!

“Ha Ha,” the Universe laughed.

“Holler if you need anything,” a friend laughed.

“Now she can’t yell at me,” my husband said, laughing in the phone with my doctor.

My mini Aussie cocked his head at my silence, but could still read my body language as I could still read his. “Ball time! Ball time! Ball time!”

I counted my blessings.

This evening, I count my blessings. Not because I can now croak out a couple of words in a lengthy sentence.

I count my blessings because they are there. Silence did not destroy even one.

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Be still and silent when you can.

Otherwise, Mother Nature will make you.

She’s clever like that.

-Carolyn

Not such an uplifting blog post

Even in Texas, we felt the Devastation and sorrow of Mother Nature’s wrath on August 29, 2005. Here is one of the newspaper clippings I taped inside my journal as I wrote about Hurricane Katrina.

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“Hurricane Katrina was the costliest natural disaster and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. The storm is currently ranked as the third most intense United States landfalling tropical cyclone, behind only the 1935 Labor Day hurricane and Hurricane Camille in 1969. Overall, at least 1,245 people died in the hurricane and subsequent floods, making it the deadliest United States hurricane since the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane. Total property damage was estimated at $108 billion (2005 USD),[1] roughly four times the damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992 in the United States.[3]”   From Wikipedia.