The best of the bad asses

Years ago, I had the pleasure of meeting and training with Ann Wolfe, known as possibly the greatest female boxer of all times. She was tough, no-nonsense. Three of us had the chance to get inside the ring with her. Of course, she wasn’t going to punch us. It was all about our own offense. Needless to say, in that small ring, she was so fast, I couldn’t get even close to her.

After I was commissioned to paint her portrait, she told me that it reminded her of her mother — a wonderful compliment since she loved her deceased mother with total abandon. She told me she hung the original above her mantel.

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Here is a great, short documentary on Ann Wolfe and her struggles to become a boxer. If rough language offends you, don’t watch. But if you like seeing how a woman survived the murder of her father, the death of a beloved mother and rose to the top, then watch.

When life doesn’t listen, don’t give up – a personal story

A long time ago, when I wore these tiny boots, I didn’t know who or what I would grow up to be.

IMG_1234.jpgWhat I did visualize at a young age, was that, no matter what, I would be a mother.

But life doesn’t always listen to the script you write in your head. It teases you, tricks you,  and leads you astray.

I fought hard for my babies. Basil thermometers, weekly blood tests, in vitro fertilization,  the drug, Clomid, that gave me a cyst on an ovary. And on it went. Each time I left the doctor’s office, I cried.

At the age of 32, after a long, painful struggle, I received a phone call. “How does a boy sound?”

We picked up our son when he was five days old. My life was complete, joyous, perfect. My son taught me how to be a mother, and, for that I will be eternally grateful.

And then? Four years later, my infant daughter filled my arms.

Now? Both of my children have given me a grandchild. And, on May 18th, I will have my third. I feel like the luckiest mom in the world.

Life is a beautiful, wonderful mystery. Don’t give up on it. Just stay tuned for the magic that will happen.

 

 

From one ship to another

for those lucky enough to survive the sinking of the Titanic.

Roughly two hours after the Titanic sunk, the steamship RMS Carpathia, reached the site and were able to rescue 705 survivors. On this day in 1903, the ship arrived safely in New York City.

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Here is a photo of Margaret Brown (the unsinkable Molly Brown), giving Captain Roston a silver cup and a gold medal.

Ironically, the Carpathia was torpedoed by the Imperial German Navy and sunk on July 17, 1918. Captain Roston was not aboard.